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Philly’s favorite place for wine, cheese and beer.

Right Now We're Loving...

Right Now We're Loving...

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Tired of the same old, same old? Take your palate on a mini-vacation with the tour guidance of Tria’s wine director, fromager and beer director. Here’s what they suggest you try at Tria right now.

Wine(s) of the Moment

It even looks rare

It even looks rare

Madeira Malmsey, D'Oliveiras, The Rare Wine Co., ’90 (Madeira, Portugal)
Madeira Verdelho “Savannah,” The Rare Wine Co., NV (Madeira, Portugal)
Available at Tria Cafe Rittenhouse, Tria Cafe Wash West

It’s winter. To forget that cold fact, I turn towards my infatuation with soul-warming fortified wines (read: richer wines whose ABV has been augmented by the addition of distilled grape spirit.) Of the fortified wine you’ll find at Tria—think Port and Sherry—Madeira is the one I love best when a chill is in the air. Madeira wine is named after the eponymous Portuguese island-vineyard located in the Atlantic Ocean off the Coast of Africa. Madeira comes in four main styles from driest to sweetest: Sercial, Verdelho, Bual, and Malmsey. The magic of Madeira can be found in how it is crafted. The base fortified wine is literally slowly heated, or maderized, in oak barrels in hot houses of sorts (called lodges) in a special method called Canteiro. This special process creates a comforting, boozy beverage with fascinating flavors of roasted nuts, stewed fruit, caramel, and toffee. We like to feature the wines imported by Madeira-madman, Mannie Berk, owner of The Rare Wine Co. You will find two Madeira selections this week at Tria Cafe. So, start a new passion or re-kindle an old adoration for Madeira in 2019 at Tria. Your cold bones will thank you.
Michael McCaulley, Wine Director & Partner

Cheese of the Moment

“You’re welcome!”

“You’re welcome!”

Yellow Springs Farm Nutcracker (Chester Springs, PA · Goat-P)
Available at Tria Cafe Rittenhouse, Tria Cafe Wash West

When you’ve run out of blankets to keep you warm, there’s always the option of an alcohol blanket for an extra layer. But for extra warmth, try some cheese that’s already wrapped up in that booze blanket: Nutcracker from Yellow Springs Farm is bathed in black walnut liqueur, also known as Nocino, which infuses this semi-soft, bright white goaty wheel with a lovely but subtle nuttiness. Husband-and-wife duo Catherine and Al Renzi live at the historic farm and native plant nursery in Chester Springs where they make small batch goat yogurt, and fresh and aged styles of goat cheese from the happiest goats (see above!) who browse pasture and clean up invasive plants in the surrounding woodlands. Catherine and Al are committed to sustainable landscapes and food systems: while the goats clean up alien plant species, the couple grows native plants to restore and reinvigorate the land. They use herbs, nuts and honeys harvested at the same farm to make their cheeses unique to their land: The Nocino that imbues richness into Nutcracker is also handcrafted at the farm. If you want to buy native plants and visit the cutest goats on earth, Yellow Springs Farm is open to visitors. You can pick up some handcrafted goat cheese while you’re there too, but Nutcracker is made only in limited batches in the winter so hurry to try this one at Tria before it’s gone!
Claire Adler, Fromager

Beer of the Moment

Fluency in Russian optional

Fluency in Russian optional

A. Le Coq Imperial Extra Double Stout, ’16 (Lewes, England · 9.0%)
Available at Tria Cafe Rittenhouse, Tria Cafe Wash West (extremely limited quantities)

Imperial Stout has become a deservedly popular winter style. It is big, brooding, and practically begs the brewer to add fun flavors ranging from chocolate to chili peppers. According to legend, the style’s Russian roots are based on Empress Catherine the Great’s keen desire for Stout, which she had likely enjoyed while visiting England. Catherine always got what she wanted, but the beer had to be brewed stronger to survive the voyage from England. Eventually Imperial Stout production took hold in the Slavic region. Estonia’s A. Le Coq brewery, founded in 1807, became the official court supplier to the Russian throne in 1912. Their Imperial Extra Double Stout was the favorite beer of Russia’s final emperor, Nicholas II (aka Vile Nicholas - love the name!) The Russian Revolution of 1917 put an end both to Nicholas and his favored beer, but happily this piece of brewing history has been revived under commission by our favorite importer, B. United International. The beer is brewed as closely to the original recipe as possible. Back then, a sour beer would have been blended in so there is a Sherry-like quality that may surprise you. The fact that you can drink just like a deposed Russian emperor is super cool, but beyond that, the beer is unique, compelling and warming.
Jon Myerow, Beer Director & Founder

Dear Tria

Dear Tria

7 Questions With Rob Tod, Allagash Brewing Co.

7 Questions With Rob Tod, Allagash Brewing Co.